Thursday, August 16, 2018

Curation #115 from my Kerouac bookshelf: Jan Kerouac: A Life in Memory edited by Gerald Nicosia



Item #115 in my Kerouac bookshelf curation project is this paperback 2009 Noodlebrain Press first edition (no printing number) of Jan Kerouac: A Life in Memory edited by Gerald Nicosia. 187 pages, it measures about 6" x 9" and is in very good condition. The provenance is that I got it directly from the editor, who signed and inscribed the title page thus:
For Rick Dale--
Who's been on the Beat
trail a long time
(still some surprises)
[drawing of a rose]
a rose from
St. Theresa--
Peace &
friendship--
Gerry Nicosia
1-24-12
Corte Madera
As the author's website states:
Jan Kerouac: A Life in Memory is the first biography of post-Beat novelist and poet Jan Kerouac. Edited by Gerald Nicosia, it contains contributions by Nicosia, Phil Cousineau, Brenda Knight, Aram Saroyan, Brad Parker, John Allen Cassady, R.B. Morris, Jacques Kirouac, Adiel Gorel, Lee Harris, Mary Emmerick, Lynn Kushel Archer, Carl Macki, John Zielinski, Buddah (John Paul Pirolli), and Dan McKenzie, as well as a long interview with Jan by Nicosia and over 40 photographs.
I reviewed this book on March 1, 2012 here, and I encourage readers to visit that link for my take on this book. If you're just joining us, Jan was a gifted writer, and we curated three of her works earlier in this project:

June 20, 2018 Baby Driver
June 21, 2018 Trainsong
June 25, 2018 Excerpts from Parrot Fever


You can contact the editor directly to see about getting a signed copy here.




Below is a picture of Shelf #4 of my Kerouac bookshelf showing the placement of this book (9th from the left) on the day I started curating my collection. Next up: Mañana Means Heaven  by Tim Z. Hernandez.

Shelf #4 of my Kerouac bookshelf

Wednesday, August 15, 2018

Curation #114 from my Kerouac bookshelf: Memory Babe: A Critical Biography of Jack Kerouac by Gerald Nicosia


Item #114 in my Kerouac bookshelf curation project is this paperback 1994 University of California Press 4th printing of Memory Babe: A Critical Biography of Jack Kerouac by Gerald Nicosia. 767 pages, it measures about 6" x 9" and is in fair condition (I refer to it frequently so it is well-used, annotated, sticky-noted, highlighted, underlined, and so on). The provenance is that I bought it used from Amazon in the early 2000s, but the title page was signed and inscribed by the author during his stay at my house in Belgrade Lakes, Maine in April 2013:
CHEZ DALE -- Belgrade Lakes
For Rick Dale --
Who keeps Jack's true
spirit alive -- in kindness
and care for justice --
in love of the simple things --
and remember the birds for
Gerard!
In peace &
friendship --
Love --
Gerry Nicosia
April 24, 2013

Memory Babe is one of the earliest  Kerouac biographies. First published by Grove Press, Inc. in 1983, it was preceded by Ann Charters' (1973) and Dennis McNally's (1979) works (curated here and here). It remains one of the most comprehensive and definitive. The title derives from the nickname young Jack's friends ascribed to him because of his prodigious memory. You can read The Washington Post's review of it here.

Memory Babe is a massive work, with biographical details of Kerouac's life (in part based on 300 some interviews Nicosia conducted) interwoven with literary criticism of Jack's major works. One of the things my great friend Richard Marsh taught me that is a fantastic thing to do is to read the sections of Memory Babe relevant to a Kerouac book and then immediately read the book. Or do it simultaneously. This takes some work with the index as all the comments about a novel are not necessarily in one spot (e.g., The Dharma Bums is listed in the index as being mentioned on pages 496, 547, 570, 573, 575, 577, 579, 585, 587, 599, 619, 627, and 640).

Memory Babe is divided into three "Books" that cover the time from Jack's birth through his death (1922-1946, 1947-1955, and 1956-1969). It includes 16 pages of pictures and a 21-page index. Author Nicosia created an archive of materials related to his work on the book, and that archive is open to the public in Jack's hometown of Lowell, MA. Richard and I visited the archive in March of 2015 and I blogged about it three times:

3-28-15
3-31-15
4-4-15 

If you are a Kerouac fan or scholar, Memory Babe is a must for your Kerouac bookshelf. Sadly, it is currently out-of-print, but you can contact the author directly to see about getting a signed copy (see #7 here), plus there are used copies available at the usual places.



Below is a picture of Shelf #4 of my Kerouac bookshelf showing the placement of this book (8th from the left) on the day I started curating my collection. Next up: Jan Kerouac: A Life in Memory edited by Gerald Nicosia.

Shelf #4 of my Kerouac bookshelf

Tuesday, August 14, 2018

Curation #113 from my Kerouac bookshelf: The Selected Letters of Allen Ginsberg and Gary Snyder edited by Bill Morgan



Item #113 in my Kerouac bookshelf curation project is this hardcover 2009 Counterpoint first printing of The Selected Letters of Allen Ginsberg and Gary Snyder edited by Bill Morgan. 321 pages, it measures about 6" x 9" and is in very good condition. The provenance? I don't remember.

Years ago, friends and family wrote each other letters to communicate. Now, it seems, that practice has been largely usurped by e-mails and texts and Tweets and Facebook messages, etc. I continue the practice with my friends Charlie and Gerry, who live at great distance, and I must say that it is quite satisfying.

To wit, Beat triumvirate member Allen Ginsberg and Kerouac muse Gary Snyder, poets both, wrote each other more than 850 letters between 1956 and 1991. Ginsberg biographer Bill Morgan has selected the most significant letters from their long friendship and collected them in this volume.

This book provides a fascinating and intimate look into the friendship and lives of two major figures in the Beat Generation story. There are 16 pages of pictures and an index. Morgan lists who was writing to whom and where they were for each letter, and provides unobtrusive explanatory footnotes when necessary. The book begins with a short preface by Morgan and a brief note from Snyder, who is still alive at this writing (Ginsberg died in 1997).

I highly recommend this book to Kerouac or Beat Generation fans. It won't disappoint.






Below is a picture of Shelf #4 of my Kerouac bookshelf showing the placement of this book (7th from the left) on the day I started curating my collection. Next up: Memory Babe: A Critical Biography of Jack Kerouac by Gerald Nicosia.

Shelf #4 of my Kerouac bookshelf

Monday, August 13, 2018

Curation #112 from my Kerouac bookshelf: Ring of Bone: Collected Poems by Lew Welch



Item #112 in my Kerouac bookshelf curation project is this paperback 2012 City Lights (no printing number) copy of Ring of Bone: Collected Poems by Lew Welch. 262 pages, it measures about 5-1/2" x 8-3/4" and is in good condition (lots of dog-ears -- I don't remember doing that but it must have been me). The provenance is that this was a review copy I received from the publisher.

And, indeed, I did review this book here on The Daily Beat here on August 16, 2012. Lew Welch was a Hell of a poet, and as I said then, I love his poetry. I provided the following caveat important to a curation effort:
. . . do not confuse this with the 1979 edition of the same title, which was published not long after Lew "left his car and his camp and his plan, and walked off [from Gary Snyder's house] into the wilds of the northern Sierra" (p. 13), never to be heard from again (or found). This is a new (2012) edition from City Lights Books with a preface by Gary Snyder (Japhy Ryder in The Dharma Bums).
Regular readers need no introduction to Welch, but if you need one, check out my review at the link above. This book definitely deserves a spot on any Kerouac bookshelf worth its salt. That's my opinion, and I'm sticking to it.



Rather than an Amazon link, here is a link to City Lights where you can -- and should -- buy Ring of Bone directly from the publisher. You're welcome, Mr. Ferlinghetti. Sorry, Mr. Bezos.



Below is a picture of Shelf #4 of my Kerouac bookshelf showing the placement of this book (6th from the left) on the day I started curating my collection. Next up: The Selected Letters of Allen Ginsberg and Gary Snyder edited by Bill Morgan.

Shelf #4 of my Kerouac bookshelf

Sunday, August 12, 2018

Curation #111 from my Kerouac bookshelf: One and Only: The Untold Story of On The Road & Lu Anne Henderson, the Woman Who Started Jack Kerouac and Neal Cassady on Their Journey by Gerald Nicosia and Anne Marie Santos



Item #111 in my Kerouac bookshelf curation project is this paperback 2012 Viva Editions first edition first printing of One and Only: The Untold Story of On The Road & Lu Anne Henderson, the Woman Who Started Jack Kerouac and Neal Cassady on Their Journey by Gerald Nicosia and Anne Marie Santos. 256 pages, it measures about 5-3/8" x8-1/8" and is in very good condition. The provenance is that I got it directly from the co-author, Gerald Nicosia, who inscribed and signed the title page.

Since we curated the hardback edition of this book yesterday (click here), there is not much else to be said. This edition does have a new preface in which Nicosia gives a behind-the-scenes look at the making of On The Road, the movie. We published an interview with Nicosia about this very topic here on The Daily Beat (with exclusive pictures) back in May of 2012.

Whether hardcover or paperback, this book definitely belongs on the bookshelf of any dedicated Kerouac fan or scholar.







Below is a picture of Shelf #4 of my Kerouac bookshelf showing the placement of this book (5th from the left) on the day I started curating my collection. Next up: Ring of Bone: Collected Poems by Lew Welch.

Shelf #4 of my Kerouac bookshelf

Saturday, August 11, 2018

Curation #110 from my Kerouac bookshelf: One and Only: The Untold Story of On The Road & Lu Anne Henderson, the Woman Who Started Jack Kerouac and Neal Cassady on Their Journey by Gerald Nicosia and Anne Marie Santos



Item #110 in my Kerouac bookshelf curation project is this hardcover 2011 Viva Editions first edition first printing of One and Only: The Untold Story of On The Road & Lu Anne Henderson, the Woman Who Started Jack Kerouac and Neal Cassady on Their Journey by Gerald Nicosia and Anne Marie Santos. 244 pages. it measures about 5-1/2" x 8-1/2" and is in very good condition. The provenance is that this was a review copy I received directly from the publisher.

Gerald Nicosia is no stranger to regular readers of The Daily Beat. He is well-known as an early Kerouac biographer (Memory Babe: A Critical Biography of Jack Kerouac) and I have posted interviews with Gerry in the past. In this book, Nicosia teams up with Anne Marie Santos, the daughter of Lu Anne Henderson ("Marylou" in On The Road) to bring us an intimate and in-depth look at the woman who, as the title indicates, "started Jack Kerouac and Neal Cassady on their journey."

I reviewed this book in-depth on February 24, 2012, so there is no need to go into detail here. You can read that review here.

This book definitely deserves a spot on your Kerouac bookshelf.







Below is a picture of Shelf #4 of my Kerouac bookshelf showing the placement of this book (4th from the left) on the day I started curating my collection. Next up: a paperback copy of One and Only: The Untold Story of On The Road & Lu Anne Henderson, the Woman Who Started Jack Kerouac and Neal Cassady on Their Journey by Gerald Nicosia and Anne Marie Santos.

Shelf #4 of my Kerouac bookshelf

Friday, August 10, 2018

Curation #109 from my Kerouac bookshelf: Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs



Item #109 in my Kerouac bookshelf curation project is this hardcover 1959 copyright Grove Press, Inc. 12th printing of William S. Burroughs' Naked Lunch. 255 pages, it measures about 5-1/2" x 8" and is in very good condition. The provenance is that I bought it from Twice-Sold Tales, a used bookstore in Farmington, Maine, for $10.50 a few years ago.

Naked Lunch is widely acknowledged as Burroughs' masterpiece, the title of which was suggested by Jack Kerouac. It means "a frozen moment when everyone sees what is on the end of every fork" (p. v). The book is a series of vignettes that Burroughs would say can be read in any order. It deals with familiar Burroughs themes: drug addiction, sexuality, the "establishment." The book was banned in Boston for obscenity, but won on appeal as having "social value."

Confession: I've tried to read Naked Lunch twice and stopped both times. Most recently, last month, I made it to p. 51 (a section titled, "The Black Meat") before I stalled out. To me, it is as incoherent as The Wild Boys, which I opined about here (make sure to read Kurt Phaneuf's comment). But that is part of Burroughs' genius, the unsettling of the reader not only by topic but also by the writing itself.

I'll slog through it eventually.







Below is a picture of Shelf #4 of my Kerouac bookshelf showing the placement of this book (3rd from the left) on the day I started curating my collection. Next up: One and Only: The Untold Story of On The Road & Lu Anne Henderson, the Woman Who Started Jack Kerouac and Neal Cassady on Their Journey by Gerald Nicosia and Anne Marie Santos.

Shelf #4 of my Kerouac bookshelf

Thursday, August 9, 2018

Curation #108 from my Kerouac bookshelf: Junky by William S. Burroughs



Item #108 in my Kerouac bookshelf curation project is this paperback 2003 Penguin Books 13th printing of Junky by William S. Burroughs. 166 pages, it measures about 5" x 7-5/8" and is in very good condition. The provenance is uncertain.

This is the "50th Anniversary Definitive Edition," featuring a 25-page introduction by Oliver Harris and seven Appendices that include Chapter 28 from the original manuscript, a helpful glossary, and other relevant pieces such as letters and previous editions' forewords or introductions. Junky was Burroughs' first published novel -- it's a semi-autobiographical account of life as a narcotics addict and homosexual in mid-20th century New York City, New Orleans, and Mexico City. Editor Harris painstakingly recreated Burroughs' original text from archival transcripts (making it the "definitive" text of a book that appeared in 1953 under the original title, Junk, authored under Burroughs' pseudonym, William Dennison).

This is a gritty, dark read, but as Burroughs novels go, it is eminently readable. He takes the reader with him into the world of the opioid addict in a way that is heart-wrenching -- and sometimes stomach-turning -- but always compelling. I know I trashed on Burroughs' The Wild Boys yesterday, but I recommend Junky if you are looking for something to read by this towering Beat Generation figure.






Below is a picture of Shelf #4 of my Kerouac bookshelf showing the placement of this book (2nd from the left) on the day I started curating my collection. Next up: Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs.

Shelf #4 of my Kerouac bookshelf

Wednesday, August 8, 2018

Curation #107 from my Kerouac bookshelf: The Wild Boys: A Book of the Dead by William S. Burroughs



Item #107 in my Kerouac bookshelf curation project is this paperback 1992 (first published by Grove in 1971) Grove Press 10th printing edition of The Wild Boys: A Book of the Dead by William S. Burroughs. 184 pages, it measures about 5-1/4" x 8" and is in very good condition. The provenance is likely that I acquired it via Amazon.

Regular readers of The Daily Beat need no explanation for why this is on my Kerouac bookshelf, but for newcomers, suffice to say that Burroughs was one of the core Beat Generation figures along with Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg (and others such as Lucien Carr, Gregory Corso, John Clellon Holmes, Herbert Huncke, and even, I suppose, Neal Cassady -- who am I missing?). Now on to the book.

According to the back cover blurb, "The Wild Boys is a futuristic tale of global warfare in which a guerrilla gang of boys dedicated to freedom battles the organized armies of repressive police states." I tried reading it when I first got it, and gave up. Same with Naked Lunch (curated soon). The only Burroughs book I have made it through is Junky (curated next).

As the NY Times reviewer said in 1971 (click here),
Burroughs is indeed a serious man and a considerable writer. But his books are not really books, they are compositions that astonish, then pall. They are subjective experiences brought into the world for the hell of it and by the excitement of whatever happens to be present in Burroughs's consciousness when he writes.
The Wild Boys appears to be classic Burroughs, full of cut-up and spontaneous prose. And my hat's off to his influence on pop culture (for example, the appearance of David Bowie's Ziggy Stardust is based on descriptions in this book).

It seems that you either "get" or "like" Burroughs' writing or you don't. I wish someone would tell me the key to one or both. I fear the problem is that I am just not cool enough, something for which there is no fix.






Below is a picture of Shelf #4 of my Kerouac bookshelf showing the placement of this book (1st on the left) on the day I started curating my collection. Next up: Junky by William S. Burroughs.

Shelf #4 of my Kerouac bookshelf


Tuesday, August 7, 2018

Curation #106 from my Kerouac bookshelf: The Backpacker by Albert Saijo



Item #106 in my Kerouac bookshelf curation project is this paperback 1977 (I guess) 101 Productions (no printing number) edition of Albert Saijo's The Backpacker. 193 pages, it measures about 4-1/4" x 7-1/8" and is in very good condition (except for a small rip in the front cover). The provenance is that I bought it used via Amazon, and as I promised yesterday, there is an interesting backstory to tell about that.

First, why is a book by Albert Saijo on my Kerouac bookshelf? Regular readers already know that he appeared in Jack's novel Big Sur as George Baso. And he co-authored Trip Trap: Haiku On the Road with Kerouac and Lew Welch (which I curated here). For those unfamiliar with Dave Moore's excellent Character Key to the Kerouac's Duluoz Legend, here is Saijo's entry in that character key (click here to visit the key - you can search for characters with the Control-F function):


This book is a great little matter-of-fact introduction to backpacking, with chapters/sections titled:

Introduction
Which Foot First?
The Outfit
Food
Getting the Trip Together
The Walk In
Camp
Out
Appendix
Index

Saijo's brother, Gompers, did the illustrations throughout the book (see the cover above for an example).

Now to the backstory. When I bought this book, it came with a very lovely note from the seller about the book's provenance. I blogged about it on May 28, 2017 and you can read all about it by clicking here.

So there you have it. A book about backpacking by one of Kerouac's friends and fellow travelers, Albert Saijo. It deserves a spot on any complete Kerouac bookshelf.








Below is a picture of Shelf #3 of my Kerouac bookshelf showing the placement of this book (bottom of the pile in front of the row) on the day I started curating my collection. Next up: The Wild Boys: A Book of the Dead by William S. Burroughs (we start Shelf #4).

Shelf #3 of my Kerouac bookshelf

Monday, August 6, 2018

Curation #105 from my Kerouac bookshelf: New Editions 2: An Anthology of Literary Discoveries (from 1957)


Item #105 in my Kerouac bookshelf curation project is this paperback undated (I think it came out in 1957) Paperback Editions Limited copy of New Editions 2: An Anthology of Literary Discoveries. 136 pages, it measures about 4-3/8" x 6" and is in rough shape (pages are coming out, page and cover corners are bent, both covers are stained). But, all the text is readable! The provenance is that I bought it on eBay.

This is one of the books that Jack Kerouac was reading from at the Village Vanguard in NYC in December 1957. You can see it in his hand in the picture below. Several other pictures exist and they have been posted in the Jack Kerouac Facebook Group (which faithful readers of The Daily Beat should join). You can also see them here.




The book contains Jack's piece, "Neal and the Three Stooges." My version contains a really obvious typo that someone fixed in pen. The rest of the book's contents can be seen below.



I couldn't be so lucky as to have stumbled on to the exact copy Jack held in his hands that night, as I am sure it is either in the Kerouac archives or long ago sold to a private collector for a pretty penny.  Nevertheless, this is a great item to have on my Kerouac bookshelf as it represents a piece of Kerouac history. According to Gerald Nicosia in Memory Babe:
Watching Jack read, Steve Allen thought it would be interesting to have a jazz musician spontaneously scoring lines as he read them; and Gilbert Millstein, who arranged the reading, offered Allen himself the job. (p. 565)

This led to the famous Jack Kerouac/Steve Allen recording still available today (Poetry for the Beat Generation, which we curated here). Bonus points if you know why else Gilbert Millstein was a critically important figure in the Kerouac story.

You won't find this on Amazon, but there is a copy in fine condition on eBay going for $125.


Below is a picture of Shelf #3 of my Kerouac bookshelf showing the placement of this book (top of the pile in front of the row) on the day I started curating my collection. Next up: The Backpacker by Albert Saijo (very cool provenance backstory on this one).

Shelf #3 of my Kerouac bookshelf


Sunday, August 5, 2018

Curation #104 from my Kerouac bookshelf: Scientologist! William S. Burroughs and the 'Weird Cult' by David S. Wills



Item #104 in my Kerouac bookshelf curation project is this paperback 2013 Beatdom Books first print edition of David S. Wills' Scientologist! William S. Burroughs and the 'Weird Cult'. 220 pages, it measures about 6" x 9" and is in very good condition. The provenance is that I acquired it via Amazon. Mr. Bezos, once again -- you are welcome.

I gave this book a very positive review on The Daily Beat on April 19, 2013. Click here to read that review. Wills' thesis can be summed up as follows (from p. 119):
He [Burroughs] was a deeply scarred human being with a mind full of awful memories and what he perceived to be handicaps - his homosexuality and drug addictions. He had sought to fix his problems through therapy, yet evidently Scientology was a quicker and more effective fix. As intelligent as Burroughs was, he was nonetheless fragile, and as wary as he was of being a "mark," he was so desperate to find a cure for his pains that he would have walked into any trap set just for him. And looking back at his history of beliefs, and his long line of particular problems, no trap was as custom-made for this man as the Church of Scientology.

Given that Burroughs was one of the Beat triumvirate along with Allen Ginsberg and our hero, Jack Kerouac, this is a fascinating read and a fitting item for one's Kerouac bookshelf.







Below is a picture of Shelf #3 of my Kerouac bookshelf showing the placement of this book (24th from the left/first item on the right) on the day I started curating my collection. Next up: New Editions 2: An Anthology of Literary Discoveries.

Shelf #3 of my Kerouac bookshelf

Saturday, August 4, 2018

Curation #103 from my Kerouac bookshelf: Naked Lens: Beat Cinema by Jack Sargeant



Item #103 in my Kerouac bookshelf curation project is this paperback 2008 Soft Skull Press first printing of Jack Sargeant's Naked Lens: Beat Cinema. 251 pages, it measures about 5-3/8" x 8-3/8" and is in very good condition. The provenance is that I received it as a review copy.

As in the past, this is another example of a review copy that I didn't review. Shame on me, even though it's another example of a review copy being sent to me unsolicited with no strings attached. I will do better with any future review copies (not that I will receive any, given that my follow-through batting average is so poor).

Naked Lens: Beat Cinema is an exploration of the celluloid expression of the Beat movement. It received some good reviews, one being here at Underground Film Journal and another here at Electric Sheep.

As expected, 1959's Pull My Daisy plays a prominent role, taking up the whole first chapter. If you haven't seen this Robert Frank/Alfred Leslie film narrated by Kerouac and starring Allen Ginsberg, Gregory Corso, David Amram, and other Beat figures, click here to watch it. Subsequent chapters deal with films such as John Cassavetes' Shadows (click here to watch it) and Conrad Rooks' Chappaqua (couldn't find a link to the full film). The first part of the book (Chapters 1-12) ends with an interview with Allen Ginsberg. The second part of the book focuses on William S. Burroughs (Chapters 10-13). For example, there is a discussion of the animated film, Ah Pook is Here, and the claymation film, The Junky's Christmas. The books wraps up with a 7-part Appendix, a bibliography, and an index of the over 300 films mentioned in the book.

My one gripe about this book is the font size. It is so small as to be nearly unreadable to these old eyes (without a magnifying glass). That aside, Naked Lens: Beat Cinema is a book that needed to be written and it makes sense to have it on one's Kerouac bookshelf.








Below is a picture of Shelf #3 of my Kerouac bookshelf showing the placement of this book (23rd from the left) on the day I started curating my collection. Next up: Scientologist! William S. Burroughs and the 'Weird Cult' by David S. Wills (which I not only read but also reviewed).

Shelf #3 of my Kerouac bookshelf

Friday, August 3, 2018

Curation #102 from my Kerouac bookshelf: Blaming Japhy Ryder: Memoir of a Dharma Bum Who Survived by Philip A. Bralich, Ph.D.



Item #102 in my Kerouac bookshelf curation project is this paperback 2012 Balboa Press (no printing number) edition of Blaming Japhy Ryder: Memoir of a Dharma Bum Who Survived by Philip A. Bralich, Ph.D. 248 pages, it measures about 6" x 9" and is in very good condition. The provenance, if memory serves, is that it was sent to me as a review copy by either the publisher or the author.

Here is the blurb about this book from Google Books:
Inspired by and responding to Jack Kerouacs [sic] Dharma Bums [sic], this memoir details the psychological and spiritual triumph over severe psychological difficulties caused by a series of traumas endured in the Peace Corps in West Africa in 1978. Surveying the spiritual landscape of America through the seventies to the present in Zen, Tibetan Buddhist, New Age and Christian movements, this memoir describes the journey of author Philip A. Bralichs [sic] life, beginning as a twenty-something, leftist, married, seventies idealist in the Peace Corps in West Africa, through an accident in the bush that cost his wife her life and himself much of the use of he left leg, and through the growing and debilitating psychological difficulties that were finally resolved through wide reading and personal experience of many of the spiritual and psychological movements of those four decades. The book commences in West Africa in 1978 but also goes back to as early as 1973, just four years after Jack Kerouac died.

You can read some reviews of the book by clicking here.

I did read this book but decided to heed Thumper's advice and thus never posted a review on The Daily Beat.







Below is a picture of Shelf #3 of my Kerouac bookshelf showing the placement of this book (22nd from the left) on the day I started curating my collection. Next up: Naked Lens: Beat Cinema by Jack Sargeant.

Shelf #3 of my Kerouac bookshelf

Thursday, August 2, 2018

Curation #101 from my Kerouac bookshelf: Loving and Hating Charles Bukowski by Linda King



Item #101 in my Kerouac bookshelf curation project is this paperback 2010 Kiss Kill Press first edition (no printing number) of Linda King's Loving and Hating Charles Bukowski. 288 pages, it measures about 6" x 9" and is in very good condition. The provenance is that I traded books with the author, who signed and inscribed the title page.

First things first. Why is this on my Kerouac bookshelf, given that Bukowski is not considered a Beat writer? Well, it is a multivariate answer. First, my friend and Kerouac biographer Gerry Nicosia suggested I get in touch with the author about her book. Second, Bukowski certainly lived what could be considered a Beat lifestyle. Third, he was a contemporary of the Beats (born two years before Kerouac). Fourth, his writing probably appeals to some fans of Beat literature. Finally, I had to have somewhere to shelve the book and my Kerouac bookshelf was accepting new items at the time.

As far as the book goes, I wrote an extensive review of it on December 2, 2012, which you can read by clicking here. I really liked this book a lot as my review indicates. Bukowski was a talented and complex guy, and Linda captures his essence in this provocative memoir.







Below is a picture of Shelf #3 of my Kerouac bookshelf showing the placement of this book (21st from the left) on the day I started curating my collection. Next up: Blaming Japhy Ryder: Memoir of a Dharma Bum Who Survived by Philip A. Bralich, Ph.D.

Shelf #3 of my Kerouac bookshelf

Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Curation #100 from my Kerouac bookshelf: Off the Road: My Years with Cassady, Kerouac, and Ginsberg by Carolyn Cassady




Item #100 in my Kerouac bookshelf curation project is this paperback 1990 Penguin Books ninth printing of Carolyn Cassady's Off the Road: My Years with Cassady, Kerouac, and Ginsberg. 436 pages, it measures about 5-3/8" x 8-1/4" and is in good condition. The provenance is likely that I bought it used from Amazon.

In order to do something different on the occasion of my 100th curation, I'm not going to opine about this book (regular readers need no background on Carolyn Cassady or her import in the Kerouac story). Instead, I will leave it to you. Leave a comment on what you thought about Off the Road.

And with that, we'll call it 100.


P.S. Don't ask me why this edition is going for $190.57 on Amazon....






Below is a picture of Shelf #3 of my Kerouac bookshelf showing the placement of this book (20th from the left) on the day I started curating my collection. Next up: Loving and Hating Charles Bukowski by Linda King. Why Bukowski on my Kerouac bookshelf? Answers next time.

Shelf #3 of my Kerouac bookshelf